Wood Burning Stoves

 


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Wood Stoves and Wood Burners

 

Homemade wood stoves can be as simple as setting up a windscreen and burning the wood inside it (pot set on stakes or rocks).  More complex versions are elevated off the ground to protect your fire and ground, incorporate integrated pot stands and sometimes even have electric fans.

 

There are several commercial and many more homemade wood stoves out on the trail and the advantages are obvious.

 

Advantages include:

 

Disadvantages include:

 

Why is using a stove better than just starting a fire on bare earth?  Wood stoves generally reflect a great deal of the heat back into the fire and protect the fire and fuel from wet and/or cold earth.  The sides of the stove will protect your fire from wind while allowing for sufficient ventilation to support a more complete burn with less smoke.  All of this keeps your fuel hot, increases gasification, and promotes a more efficient burn.  As a result, you will need a fraction of the wood to cook up a meal in a stove compared to an open fire.

 

A well designed stove will also allow you to easily set a pot at a reasonable height over your flame.  Not only is it easier to set your pot on a stove compared to an open fire, the heat and exhaust of a stove is usually funneled straight up towards the bottom of your pot.

 

Wood stoves may also be allowed where campfire aren't and can be environmentally friendly in that they don't use up as much of the forest for fuel, produce as much smoke as a campfire and if purposefully built, will not even burn the ground they are on (leave no trace). 

 

 


Zip Stoves/Turbo Stoves

 

A zip or turbo stove is a wood stove which allows you to force fresh air into your stove.  This is often done with an electric fan, but you can also use a blow hose, hand/foot pump or bellow.  This added air and really speed up the burn of your fuel and increase fuel efficiency, allowing you to cook more with less fuel.

 

10oz Sierra Titanium Stove

 

ZZ manufacturing makes the well know Sierra Zip Ztove which is a self contained wood stove with a battery operated fan to keep the fire going.  The original steel versioni of this weights over a pound without the weight of the battery (AA or D cell) which makes it seem heavy compared to other backpacking stoves.  This can be offset by the weight of fuel which you don't need to carry on longer trips and to coolness of this stove.  There are a number of ways to improve and/or lighten the steel version of the stove (see Links) and a 10 ounce titanium version is also available.  It is also relatively easy to add a solar cell to recharge batteries and help power the fan during the day.

 

5.4oz Stove (including pot stand)

 

Homemade versions of this stove can be made from various sized tin cans, pots or sheet metal (such as aluminum flashing) and an electric fan (computer fans work well) with a power source.  Air output to the stove can be controlled by adding variable resistors to your electrical circuit or by just moving an unattached fan further away from the stove opening.  The stove shown above uses and inner wall made from a steel can which contains the fire, helps distribute the forced air flow and insulates the fan from the heat of your fire. 

 

Jerry Pepera's Zip Stove

 

Building  your stove so that it is off the ground and placing the fan centered underneath it provides more equal distribution of forced air and protects the ground.

 

Made from 12oz Chicken and 26oz Decaf cans

 

Alternately, placing the fan on the side of the stove enables you to build a less complex stove without a bottom which should be easier to build, harder to break, harder to tip over and lighter.

 

 

BioLite Thermoelectric Stove

 

Various versions of the BioLte use thermoelectric generators which powers a fan on the side of the stove and can also produces enough spare electricity to charge your electric gadgets.   The BioLite CampStove weighs in at 33 oz (935 grams)

 

Similar stoves include:

MAGH Smoke Burnger Stove

Making Your own pulsed air wood stove 

Web Archive - woodgas-stove.com Prior to 2013 offered a nice looking stove

 

 


Kettle/Chimney/Volcano Stoves

 

Chimney Kettle Parts

            

Chimney Kettle Setup

 

Chimney water heaters have been around for a long time.  The Russians have their Samovar and the Irish, Brits and Aussies all have similar kettle designs.  These incorporate a chimney that built into the middle of and out the top the kettle.  The kettle is set on a fire plate/bowl and when the fire gets going, hot air rises up the chimney and out the top of the kettle - forcing fresh air to be drawn into air inlet opening at the bottom of the fire pit, feeding the fire and keeping the flames  relatively hot.  These are generally made of brass, tin or aluminum and depending on how they are sealed (welded/brazed, riveted, rolled, epoxied, good/bad quality, etc), determines if and how much they will leak.

 

19.2oz Kelly Kettle

 

Homemade versions of the chimney kettle are possible, but difficult.  There are a number of ways to setup the inner and outer walls of a kettle, but getting them to seal can be challenging.  High temp epoxies such as JB weld are not suitable for contact with flames and not be non toxic.  TIG welding allows for a solid heavy metal and toxin free seal for the DIYer taking on this challenge, but of course, this take a bit of skill and the right equipment.  Brazing/soldering allows for an easier seal, but can coat your kettle with some less than desirable metals.  One should avoid rods with lead in them as this will likely leach into your boiling water and is toxic.

 

 


Collapsible Wood Stoves

 

Disassembled Fire-Spout 100

 

Collapsible wood burning stoves allow you to easily dismantle, flatten and pack away what would otherwise be a very bulky setup.

 

18oz Stainless Fire-Spout-Mini and 32oz Galvanized Fire-Spout 100

 

O.C.Outdoor's Fire-Spout is one of the few truly collapsible commercial wood burning stoves on the market.

 

520g Magic Stove

 

The Swiss Magic Stove is also a nice little stainless setup.  Collapses to 4.5" x 5.9" x  0.4".

 

Nimblewill Nomad's Wood Burning Stove with optional front

 

Nimblewill Nomad's "Little Dandy" is a collapsible stove that can be made form steel, titanium or thick aluminum sheet.  It can be heavy (11.5oz range) if you use heavy gauge steel (22GA) but flattens down nicely and is easily packable (although it will not fit in a small pot such as the Grease Pot unless you alter the dimensions).  Galvanized steel is never recommended as it releases heavy metals into the air when heated, but titanium makes great lightweight heat resistant walls.  See the template page for templates.

 

If you are not up to making one of these yourself, Chris Randall was willing to send you one from the UK for about US$25 plus shipping.  According to Chris, the Kelly Kettle fits right on to of the Nomad without modification.

 

 

Calculated weight estimates for Nimblewill Nomad's Wood Burning Stove

(including optional front)

Stainless 22GA

11.7oz

Stainless 24GA

9.4oz

Stainless 26GA

7oz

Stainless 28GA

5.9oz

Stainless 30GA

4.7oz

 

 

Steel 22GA

11.4oz

Steel 24GA

9.1oz

Steel 26GA

6.8oz

Steel 28GA

5.7oz

Steel 30GA

Side of solvent can 0.012"

4.6oz

 

 

Titanium 22GA

6.7oz

Titanium 24GA

5.3oz

Titanium 26GA

4.0oz

Titanium 28GA

Thru-Hiker's 0.016"

3.3oz

Titanium 30GA

2.7oz

 

 


Can/Tube Stoves

 

Simpler stove designs don't require watertight joints, fans or electricity.  Some are basically ventilated steel cans or tubes, while others are much more sophisticated with well designed ventilation which promote gasification and more complete burning of fuel. 

 

There have been many manufactured portable designs dating back to at least the 1800s made of steel and more recently with titanium.  Homemade versions can generally be fabricated from cans, pots (such as light weight titanium pots), or metal sheet.  Aluminum flashing may seem like a great option for a light weight hiker on a budget, and it may work for a few fire-ups but will burn up after you get it hot enough.  See our Potstand page for information and calculators that will help with design planning.

 

14.8 oz Trailstove

 

The US$20 Trailstove comes with a hose and tube for blowing.  This simple and relatively lightweight conical design allows for reasonably efficient burning of twigs and wood found in nature without the complexity of fans or moving parts.  The use of a tube and hose for blowing a nice addition when trying to burn less than completely dry fuel.

 

21.5oz Trekstov

 

More sophisticated versions have adjustable ventilation and are built sturdy (and heavy) for long term use.  The MAGH Twister Stove is an example of a double walled vortex stove which uses centrifugal decomposition to mix smoke with air for a more complete burn.  This allows for longer cooking with less fuel and is durable enough to throw in your canoe without too much worry of it being crushed.

 

Trimmed 26oz Coffee Can (3.5oz)

 

Simple homemade versions can be made from trimmed down tin cans with bottom ventilation (a church key or unibit works well for this).  These wood burners may also double and pot stands for alcohol and/or solid fuel stoves.  A slightly lighter, rustproof and much more expensive stove may be fabricated from a titanium pot.

Unibit - ideal for making or enlarging holes in thin metal

 

Tools such as the Unibit shown above allow you to make nice clean holes in the side of steel or titanium.  These are nice if your end goal is to make a stove which not only works, but looks nice to boot.

 

 


WoodGas Stoves

 

Image modified from:

A Wood-Gas Stove for Developing Countries
T. B. Reed and Ronal Larson

 

If wood is heated up and gasified, it has the potential of burning more completely, efficiently and with little or no smoke and heavy pollutants.  These stoves tend to be a bit more complex than a tin can with holes punched in it and therefore tend to weigh a bit more.  There design allows for cleaning cooking with less emissions and better fuel efficiency.  This is a great feature for those cooking indoors and with limited resources.  If you are a backpacker, this may mean that you can pack less wood pellets or still cook where fuel is more scarce.  For more information on wood gasification, check out Wood-Gas Stoves for Developing Countries  and Testing and Modeling the Wood Gas Turbo Stove.

 

The picture above depicts a stove made from coffee cans and is more or less self-explanatory except for the "Gas Wick."  The gas wick is a smaller diameter metal can suspended by wires inside the larger coffee can.  The smaller can is inverted so that the opening is facing down at the fire.  This wick becomes very hot and draws gas and air up along its sides, and prevents air from going down the chimney.

 

It is also important to note that fuel is ignited from the top down for the gasification process to work.

 

 


Caveats

 

First - If you would like to use wood as a fuel you will need to be able to start a fire.  The most important aspect of this is fire starting skill.  Learn to start a fire.  Here are some basic techniques-

 

Second - You will need a flame or spark, preferably waterproof or in a waterproof container

 

Third - You may need tinder and/or a fire starter, especially if you are likely to have wet or damp wood. 

 

Fourth - Unless you are packing in wood and packing out ash, wood stoves are not entirely "leave no trace."  Beware of uppity and/or extremist hikers and rangers who might frown on you burning up their wilderness.  That and you might just be part of a real eco problem - depending on where you decide to use a wood stove.

 

 


Wood Properties

 

Beyond wood, many other biofuels may be burned.  You can use agricultural waste, paper products, dried humanimal waste, coal, charcoal, manufactured fire logs, last year's fruitcake, etc.

 

Firewood Quality

Hard Woods

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Alder

Medium-Low

2506

Easy

Fair

Good

Moderate

Slight

Apple

High-Medium

4132

Difficult

Difficult

Excellent

Few

Excellent

Ash , Black

Medium

4132

Easy-Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Good-Excellent

Few

Slight

Ash, Green

High

3590

Easy-Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Good-Excellent

Few

Slight

Ash, White

High

3,689

Easy-Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Good-Excellent

Few

Slight

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Aspen, Bigtooth

Low

2439

Easy

Easy

Good

Few

Slight

Aspen, Quaking

Low

2373

Easy

Easy

Good

Few

Slight

Basswood

Low

2174

Easy

Easy

Poor

Few

Good

Beech

High

3757

Difficult

Difficult

Excellent

Few

Good

Beech, American

High

3793

Difficult

Difficult

Excellent

Few

Good

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Beech, Blue

High

3890

Difficult

Difficult

Excellent

Few

Good

Birch, White

Medium

3179

Easy

Easy

Good

Moderate

Slight

Birch, Sweet

Medium

4065

Easy

Easy

Good

Moderate

Slight

Birch, Gray

Medium

3179

Easy

Easy

Good

Moderate

Slight

Birch, Paper

Medium

3260

Easy

Easy

Good

Moderate

Slight

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Birch, Yellow

High-Medium

3723

Moderate

Easy

Good

Moderate

Slight

Birch, Black

High-Medium

3890

Moderate

Easy

Good

Moderate

Slight

Buckeye, Horsechestnut

Low

2235

Moderate

Poor

Few

Slight

Boxelder

Low

2797

Easy

Poor

Many

Slight

Butternut (white walnut)

Low

2440

Easy

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Catalpa

Low

2360

Difficult

Good

Few

Fair

Cherry, Black

Medium

2880

Easy

Difficult

Excellent

Few

Excellent

Cherry

Medium

3184

Easy

Difficult

Excellent

Few

Excellent

Chestnut

Low

2708

Easy

Many

Good

Coffeetree, Kentucky

High

3112

Moderate

Good

Few

Good

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Cottonwood

Low

2102

Easy

Easy

Good

Moderate

Slight

Dogwood

High

4331

Difficult

Good

Fair

Few

Elm, American

Medium

3116

Very Difficult

Fair

Good

Very Few

Fair

Elm, Rock

Medium

3860

Very Difficult

Fair

Good

Very Few

Fair

Elm, Siberian

Medium

3020

Very Difficult

Fair

Good

Very Few

Fair

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Elm, Slippery

Medium

3251

Very Difficult

Fair

Good

Very Few

Fair

Eucalyptus

Very High

4560

  -Swamp yate

Difficult

Poor

Excellent

Few

Good

  -Sugar gum

Difficult

Poor

Excellent

Few

Good

  -Tasmanian blue gum

Fair

Fair

Good

Few

Good

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

  -River red gum

Difficult

Poor

Excellent

Moderate

Good

  -SA blue gum

Difficult

Poor

Excellent

Few

Good

Hackberry

High

3319

Easy

Good

Few

Slight

Hazel

High

Moderate

Moderate

Hawthorn

High

Moderate

Moderate

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Hickory, True

Very High

4,327

Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Excellent

Moderate

Excellent

Hickory, Mockernut

Very High

4332

Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Excellent

Moderate

Excellent

Hickory, Pignut

Very High

4332

Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Excellent

Moderate

Excellent

Hickory, Shagbark

Very High

4333

Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Excellent

Moderate

Excellent

Hickory, Shellbark

Very High

4195

Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Excellent

Moderate

Excellent

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Holly, American

3387

Difficult

Honeylocust

High

3832

Easy

Excellent

Few

Slight

Hophornbeam, Eastern

4266

Ironwood (Hornbeam)

Very High

4267

Very Difficult

Very Difficult

Excellent

Few

 

Laurel, California

3456

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Locust, Black

Very High

4470

Very Difficult

Difficult

Excellent

Very Few

Slight

Madrone

High

3925

Difficult

Difficult

Excellent

Very Few

Slight

Maple, Bigleaf

High-Medium

2980

Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Excellent

Few

Excellent

Maple, Silver

High-Medium

2981

Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Excellent

Few

Fair

Maple, Black

High-Medium

3523

Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Excellent

Few

Excellent

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Maple, Soft

High-Medium

2924

Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Excellent

Few

Excellent

Maple, Red

High-Medium

3318

Moderate

Fair-Difficult

Excellent

Few

Excellent

Maple, Sugar

High

3793

Moderate

Difficult

Excellent

Few

 Excellent

Mesquite

Very High

 

Very Difficult

Very Difficult

Excellent

Few

 

Mulberry

Medium

3712

Easy

Excellent

Good

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Oak, Bur

High

3928

Easy

Difficult

Excellent

Few

Fair

Oak, Red

High

3680

Moderate

Difficult

Excellent

Few

Fair

Oak, White

Very High

4200

Moderate

Difficult

Excellent

Few

Excellent

Osage Orange

High

 4728

 Moderate

 

Excellent

 Many

Excellent

Pecan

High

Moderate

Good

Few

Good

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Persimmon

4332

Moderate

Pine, Lodgepole

Low

2610

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Good

Poplar, Yellow (Tuliptree)

Low

2708

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Bitter

Sweet Gum

Medium

3115

Difficult

Fair

Fair

Few

Sycamore

Medium

3115

Difficult

Very Difficult

Good

Few

Good

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Walnut

High-Medium

3454

Moderate

Fair

Good

Few

Fair

Willow

Low

2438

Easy

Fair

Poor

Moderate

Slight

 

Soft Woods

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Cedar, White

Medium-Low

2100

Easy

Easy

Poor

Moderate

Excellent

Cedar, Eastern

Medium-Low

2981

Easy

Easy

Poor

Many

Excellent

Cedar, W. Red

Medium-Low

2100

Easy

Easy

Poor

Many

Excellent

Cypress

Medium

2844

Easy

Moderate

Few

Fir, Douglas

Medium

3049

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Slight

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Fir, Balsam

Low

2236

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Slight

Fir, Grand

Low

2371

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Slight

Fir, White

Low

2104

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Slight

Hemlock, Eastern

Medium-Low

2573

Easy

Easy

Poor

Many

Good

Hemlock, Western

Medium-Low

2847

Easy

Easy

Poor

Many

Good

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Juniper

Medium

3150

Medium

Poor

Many

Excellent

Larch, Western (Tamarack)

High-Medium

3318

Easy-Moderate

Easy-Fair

Fair

Many

Slight

Pine, Lodgepole

Low

2576

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Good

Pine, Ponderosa

Medium-Low

2573

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Good

Pine, E&W White

Medium-Low

2303

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Good

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Pine, Sugar

Low

2302

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Good

Pine, Yellow

High-Medium

2610

Easy

Easy

Fair

Moderate

Good

Pinon

High

3000

Easy

Many

Redwood, Old Growth

Medium

2573

Easy

Easy-Fair

Poor

Many

Slight

Redwood, Second Growth

Medium

2302

Easy

Easy-Fair

Poor

Many

Slight

Species

Heat

Weight*

Ease Of Splitting

Ease Of Starting

Coaling Qualities

Sparks

Fragrance

Spruce, Black

Low

2575

Easy

Easy

Poor

Few

Slight

Spruce, Engeiman

Low

2234

Easy

Easy

Poor

Few

Slight

Spruce, Norway

Low

2240

Moderate

Easy

Poor

Many

Slight

Spruce, Sitka

Low

2506

Easy

Poor

Slight

Yew

High

Difficult

Difficult

Good

 

*Weight - pound /cord - seasoned wood.

Cord - stack 4' x 4' x 8' feet high (~85 ft3 with air space removed)

Face cords - 4' x 8' x <4' (usually about 16" deep)

 

Alder:  Poor heat output and short lasting.  A low quality firewood.  Produces nice charcoal that burn steady and is useful for homemade gunpowder.

 

Apple:  Great fuel that bums slow and steady when dry, with little flame, sparking or spitting. It has a pleasing scent.  It is easier to cut green.  Great for cooking.

 

Ash:  Considered one of the burning wood with steady flame and good heat output.  It will bum when green, but not as well as when dry.  Easily to saw and split.

 

Beech:  Similar to ash, but only burns fair when green. If it has a fault, it may shoot embers out a long ways.  It is easy to chop.

 

Birch:  This has good heat output but burns quickly. The smell is also pleasant.  It will burn unseasoned.  Can cause gum deposits in chimney if used a lot.  Rolled up pitch from bark makes a good firestarter and can be peeled from trees without damaging them.

 

Blackthorn: Burns slowly, with lots of heat and little smoke.

 

Cedar:  This is a great wood that puts out a lot of lasting of heat.  It produces a small flame, a nice scent, and lots of crackle and pop.  Great splitting wood.  Best when dry but small pieces can be burned unseasoned.  Good for cooking.

 

Cherry:  A slow burning wood with good heat output.  Has a nice sent. Should be seasoned well.  Slow to start.

 

Chestnut:  A mediocre fuel that produces a small flame and weak heat output.  It also shoots out ambers.

 

Douglas Fir:  A poor fuel that produces little flame or heat.

 

Elder:   A mediocre fuel that burns quickly without much heat output and tends to have thick acrid smoke.  The Hag Goddess is know to reside in the Elder tree and burning it invites death.  Probably best avoided.

 

Elm:  A variable fuel (Dutch elm disease) with a high water content (140%) that may smoke violently and should be dried for two years for best results.  You may need faster burning wood to get elm going.  A large log set on the fire before bed will burn till morn.  Splitting can be difficult and should be done early on.

 

Eucalyptus:  A fast burning wood with a pleasant smell and no spitting.  It is full of sap and oils when fresh and can start a chimney fire if burned unseasoned.  The stringy wood fiber may be hard to split and one option is to slice it into rings and allow to season and self split.  The gum from the tree produces a fresh medicinal smell on burned which may not be the best for cooking with.

 

Hawthorn:  Good firewood. Burns hot and slow.

 

Hazel:  An excellent fast burning fuel but tends to burn up a bit faster than most other hard woods.  Allow to season.

 

Holly:  A good firewood that will burn when green, but best if dried a year.  It is fast burning with a bright flame but little heat.

 

Hornbeam:  Burns almost as good as beech with a hot slow burning fire.

 

Horse Chestnut:  A low quality firewood with a good flame and heating power but spits a lot.

 

Laburnum:  Completely poisonous tree with acrid smoke that taints food and is best never used.

 

Larch:  Crackly, scented, and fairly good for heat.  It needs to be seasoned well and forms an oily soot in chimneys. 

 

Laurel:  Produces a brilliant flame.

 

Lime:  A poor quality fuel with dull flame.  Good for carving

 

Maple:  A good firewood.

 

Oak:  Oak has a sparse flame and the smoke is acrid if not seasoned for two years.  Dry old oak is excellent for heat, burning slowly and steadily until whole log collapses into cigar-like ash.

 

Pear:  Burns with good heat, good scent and no spitting.  Needs to be seasoned well.

 

Pine:  Bums with a splendid flame, but apt to spit. Needs to be seasoned well and is another oily soot in chimney wood.  Smells great and its resinous wood makes great kindling.

 

Plane:  Burns pleasantly, but is apt to throw sparks if very dry.

 

Plum:  Wood provides good heat with a nice aromatic sent.

 

Poplar:  A terrible fuel that doesn't burn well and produces a black choking smoke even when seasoned.

 

Rowan:  A good firewood that burns hot and slow.

 

Rhododendron:  Old thick and tough stems burn well. 

 

Robinia (Acacia):  Burns slowly, with good heat, but with acrid smoke. 

 

Spruce:  A poor firewood that burns too quickly and with too many sparks.

 

Sycamore:  Burns with a good flame, with moderate heat. Useless green.

 

Sweet Chestnut:  Burns when seasoned but tends to spits continuously and excessively.

 

Thorn:  One of the best firewood. Burns slowly, with great heat and little smoke.

 

Walnut:  Low to good value to burning.  It a nice aromatic scent.

 

Wellingtonia:  Poor for use as a firewood.

 

Willow:  A poor fire wood that must be dry to use.  Even when seasoned, it burns slowly, with little flame. Apt to spark.

 

Yew:  This burns slowly, with fierce heat. The scent is pleasant.  Another carving favorite.  Note that every part of this plant, except for the fruit contains poisonous taxines.  Death to livestock after ingestion of this plant is well documented and here are reported cases of suicides from ingestion of leaves.  Sawdust is dangerous if ingested or inhaled.  The Romans reported death after ingestion of wine stored in Yew vessels, yet Yew cups, bowls and plates are still very popular - not that this makes them any less poisonous.  Taxines are carried in smoke and the safety of using this wood for cooking or heat is questionable.

 


Rhymes

 

These hardwoods burn well and slowly,
Ash, beech, hawthorn oak and holly.
Softwoods flare up quick and fine,
Birch, fir, hazel, larch and pine.
Elm and willow you'll regret,
Chestnut green and sycamore wet

 



Beechwood fires are bright and clear
If the logs are kept a year.
Chestnut's only good, they say,
If for long 'tis laid away.
But Ash new or Ash old
Is fit for a queen with crown of gold.


Birch and fir logs bum too fast
Blaze up bright and do not last.
It is by the Irish said
Hawthom bakes the sweetest bread.
Elm wood bums like churchyard mould,
E ' en the very flames are cold.
But Ash green or Ash brown
Is fit for a queen with golden crown.


Poplar gives a bitter smoke,
Fills your eyes and makes you choke.
Apple wood will scent your room
With an incense like perfume.
Oaken logs. if dry and old.
Keep away the winter's cold.
But Ash wet or Ash dry
A king shall warm his slippers by.


 

Beechwood logs burn bright and clear,
If the wood is kept a year
Store your Beech for Christmas-tide,
With new-cut holly laid aside
Chestnut's only good, they say
If for years it's stored away
Birch and Fir wood burn too fast,
Blaze too bright, and do not last
Flames from larch will shoot up high,
And dangerously the sparks will fly....
But Ashwood green,
And Ashwood brown
Are fit for Queen with golden crown.

 

Oak logs will warm you well
That are old and dry
Logs of pine will sweetly smell
But the sparks will fly
Birch logs will burn too fast
Chestnut scarce at all sir
Hawthorn logs are good to last
That are cut well in the fall sir
Holly logs will burn like wax
You could burn them green
Elm logs burn like smouldering flax
With no flame to be seen
Beech logs for winter time
Yew logs as well sir
Green elder logs it is a crime
For any man to sell sir

 


 

Beechwood fires burn bright and clear
If the logs are kept a year
Store your beech for Christmastide
With new holly laid beside
Chestnuts only good they say
If for years tis stayed away
Birch and firwood burn too fast
Blaze too bright and do not last
Flames from larch will shoot up high
Dangerously the sparks will fly
But Ashwood green and Ashwood brown
Are fit for a Queen with a golden crown

Oaken logs, if dry and old
Keep away the winters cold
Poplar gives a bitter smoke
Fills your eyes and makes you choke
Elmwood burns like churchyard mould
Even the very flames burn cold
Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread
So it is in Ireland said
Applewood will scent the room
Pears wood smells like a flower in bloom
But Ashwood wet and Ashwood dry
A King may warm his slippers by.


 

Pear logs and apple logs
They will scent your room
And cherry logs across the dogs
They smell like flowers of broom
But Ash logs smooth and grey
Buy them green or old, sir
And buy up all that come your way
They're worth their weight in gold sir

 


 

Logs to Burn, Logs to burn, Logs to burn,
Logs to save the coal a turn,
Here's a word to make you wise,
When you hear the woodman's cries.


Never heed his usual tale,
That he has good logs for sale,
But read these lines and really learn,
The proper kind of logs to burn.


Oak logs will warm you well,
If they're old and dry.
Larch logs of pine will smell,
But the sparks will fly.


Beech logs for Christmas time,
Yew logs heat well.
"Scotch" logs it is a crime,
For anyone to sell.


Birch logs will burn too fast,
Chestnut scarce at all.
Hawthorn logs are good to last,
If you cut them in the fall.


Holly logs will burn like wax,
You should burn them green,
Elm logs like smouldering flax,
No flame to be seen.


Pear logs and apple logs,
They will scent your room,
Cherry logs across the dogs,
Smell like flowers in bloom


But ash logs, all smooth and grey,
Burn them green or old;
Buy up all that come your way,
They're worth their weight in gold.

 


 

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